BookReaderMagazine.com Featured Interview With Joey Pinkney

BookReaderMagazine.com: Tell us a little about yourself. Where were you raised? Where do you live now?

Joey Pinkney: I am a reader/book promoter turned author. I spent many years promoting authors using social media and various websites. Now, I’m spending more time writing, publishing and marketing my own stories. I write literary fiction and pull from urban fiction, paranormal, romance, women’s fiction and historical fiction to build stories full of layers and symbolism. Read more

The Legend of Tanisha Biggers’ First Review

After being available for download for about a month, The Legend of Tanisha Biggers (TLoTB) FINALLY got its first review. I’m sure there will be more to come as I continue to spread the word about this story, but, for me, the first review marks an important point in a story’s life cycle. It’s proof-positive that somebody, anybody, read the story.

And that’s what we authors write for, right? To be read? (Rhetorical.) More importantly, a review denotes that the story compelled someone to give their opinion of the story – good or bad. Without further ado, here is the review The Legend of Tanisha Biggers: Deluxe Edition: Read more

Jackie Loggins reviews “Fallen Towers”

I met Jackie Loggins in the chat room of the Black Science Fiction Society. After conversing a bit, she expressed interest in reviewing one of my short stories. She picked, “Children in the City of the Fallen Towers,” and the rest is history…

Excerpt from Review:

“First, I would like to thank author Joey Pinkney for working with me to put together this book review. He was so gracious in allowing me to pick a title from his catalog. Once I reached his  author page, I immediately knew which book I wanted to review for this segment.

When it comes to the events and tragedies of 9/11, we often hear about the fallen heroes, widowed spouses and most of all the terrorists who were involved. But rarely have I personally seen news segments or articles or books of personal stories about the orphans in which the events of 9/11 created.

And reading this short story brought up a lot questions in my mind as to why this is so. Aren’t the children of lost parents voices just as important as a widow(er) or the family of one of the terrorists? In our society, to be parent-less puts you in a very vulnerable and often dangerous situation.”

Read the full review here:

http://elrighouse.com/fallen-towers-provides-a-front-row-seat-to-the-struggles-of-an-under-represented-victim-of-911/